Depression Medication


Peter Breggin is the favorite whipping boy of the big Big Pharma, the drug industry, which makes billions of dollars by encouraging addiction to anti-depressants. The illness insurance industry is an aider and abettor. It is cheaper to pay for medications than to do real, effective psychotherapy–even though psychotherapy has been demonstrated to be equally effective.

Breggin is one of a growing body of psychiatrists and neurologists and other researchers who have been describing the king’s lack of clothing. I arrived on this scene late, having ignored the issue for years. But having seen the disturbing results in my own clients, I have joined the chorus of skeptics.

Increasingly evidence of the disastrous results of the anti-depressant epidemic are showing up in research and even getting past the censors of popular publications.

This article is from Science Daily.

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Psychological side-effects of anti-depressants worse than thought

Date:
February 25, 2014
Source:
University of Liverpool
Summary:
Thoughts of suicide, sexual difficulties and emotional numbness as a result of anti-depressants may be more widespread than previously thought, a researcher has found. In a survey of 1,829 people who had been prescribed anti-depressants, the researchers found large numbers of people — over half in some cases — reporting on psychological problems due to their medication, which has led to growing concerns about the scale of the problem of over-prescription of these drugs.

“While the biological side-effects of antidepressants, such as weight gain and nausea, are well documented, the psychological and interpersonal effects have been largely ignored or denied. They appear to be alarmingly common,” the lead author states.
Credit: © Photographee.eu / Fotolia

A University of Liverpool researcher has shown that thoughts of suicide, sexual difficulties and emotional numbness as a result of anti-depressants may be more widespread than previously thought.

In a survey of 1,829 people who had been prescribed anti-depressants, the researchers found large numbers of people — over half in some cases — reporting on psychological problems due to their medication, which has led to growing concerns about the scale of the problem of over-prescription of these drugs.

Psychologist and lead researcher, Professor John Read from the University’s Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, said: “The medicalization of sadness and distress has reached bizarre levels. One in ten people in some countries are now prescribed antidepressants each year.

“While the biological side-effects of antidepressants, such as weight gain and nausea, are well documented, the psychological and interpersonal effects have been largely ignored or denied. They appear to be alarmingly common.”

Each person completed an online questionnaire which asked about twenty adverse effects. The study was carried out in New Zealand and all of the participants had been on anti-depressants in the last five years. The survey factored in people’s levels of depression and asked them to report on how they had felt while taking the medication.

Over half of people aged 18 to 25 in the study reported suicidal feelings and in the total sample there were large percentages of people suffering from ‘sexual difficulties’ (62%) and ‘feeling emotionally numb’ (60%). Percentages for other effects included: ‘feeling not like myself’ (52%), ‘reduction in positive feelings’ (42%), ‘caring less about others’ (39%) and ‘withdrawal effects’ (55%). However, 82% reported that the drugs had helped alleviate their depression.

Professor Read concluded: “While the biological side-effects of antidepressants, such as weight gain and nausea, are well documented, psychological and interpersonal issues have been largely ignored or denied. They appear to be alarmingly common.”

“Effects such as feeling emotionally numb and caring less about other people are of major concern. Our study also found that people are not being told about this when prescribed the drugs.

“Our finding that over a third of respondents reported suicidality ‘as a result of taking the antidepressants’ suggests that earlier studies may have underestimated the problem.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Liverpool. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. John Read, Claire Cartwright, Kerry Gibson. Adverse emotional and interpersonal effects reported by 1829 New Zealanders while taking antidepressants. Psychiatry Research, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.01.042


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One Comment

  1. Damien Wormwood
    Posted March 19, 2014 at 5:12 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Depression sucks. Definitely effects the gut. Psychiatric drugs make it worse, along with causing many other problems. I’ve been saying that for years. Problem is, psychiatrists are very quick to treat this as evidence of more mental illness and prescribe more drugs to treat it, further screwing up the gut and other systems, and complicating the situation exponentially. Anyone around here ever read Jon Rappoport or Peter Breggin? Psychiatry sucks. The DSM is bullshit.

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